Wednesday, March 25, 2015

J is for Japanese Print - Watercolor Batik

Evening Snow in Asakusa (detail-1) c.1845
After Utagawa Hiroshige
This batik was copied from a portion of a 19th century woodblock print.
https://www.etsy.com/listing/227606648/watercolor-batik-on-rice-paper-original?ref=related-0



Evening Snow in Asakusa (detail-2) c.1845
After Utagawa Hiroshige
This batik was copied from a portion of a 19th century woodblock print.
https://www.etsy.com/listing/227607242/watercolor-batik-on-rice-paperoriginal?ref=shop_home_active_1



 "One day in 1871, legend has it, a French artist named Claude Monet walked into a food shop in Amsterdam where he had gone to escape the Prussian siege of Paris.  There he spotted some Japanese prints being used as wrapping paper.  He was so taken by the engravings that he bought one on the spot.  The purchase changed his
life - and the history of Western art."
Don Morrison, Time Magazine

Monet collected over 200 Japanese prints.

The only thing I remember from art history classes is the story of the Impressionists and post-Impressionists (a selective memory, I'm sure).   During the time of the Impressionists, there was a particular frenzy for all things Japanese.

"In the West, what we admired most of all was this bold way of cropping images; these people taught us to compose differently."
Claude Monet 

Monet, Manet, Degas, Pisarro,  Toulouse-Lautrec, Van Gogh, and Gauguin are among those whose work was impacted by 17th-19th Century Japanese woodblock prints.

“I envy the Japanese artists for the incredible neat clarity which all their works have. It is never boring and you never get the impression that they work in a hurry. It is as simple as breathing; they draw a figure with a couple of strokes with such an unfailing easiness as if it were as easy as buttoning one’s waist-coat.” 
Vincent Van Gogh

If it were only that easy, Monsieur Van Gogh.

14 comments:

  1. Japanese art has never caught my fancy, neither style or composition, however, your pieces are really exquisite. I love the snow lodge background and the splash of color in the people that lends so much life to this work. Really beautiful, Chris!!

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  2. You really captured a sense of mystery and beauty. You thumbs up piece was gorgeous too.

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  3. It's really delightful Chris! Japanese art is very basic but so artful. You created an unique piece. Have a lovely day, :)

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  4. They are simply beautiful just enough color to attract the eye.

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  5. The splash of color makes this an amazing piece. Love it!

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  6. Thank you, Sherry. The color is compliments of Mr. Hiroshige.

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  7. Thank you for your lovely comment, Helen.

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  8. Thank you, Hilda. I love Hiroshige.

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  9. I absolutely love this, Chris!!! :)

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  10. AWESOME! what an amazing copy you achieved. Well Chris...
    Is there anything you can't do?

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  11. Very funny, Julie. Copying is easy. What you achieved in your last commission I wouldn't even attempt -(http://www.juliefordoliver.blogspot.com/)

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