Sunday, December 9, 2018

Women of Advent - Rahab


This is the second Sunday of Advent,
and Rahab is the second woman
listed in the genealogy of Jesus according to Matthew 1:1-17.

Rahab's story is told in the Book of Joshua.

Church window depicting Joshua at Jericho
Pixabay

After Moses' death, Joshua became the person
to lead the Jewish people
into the Promised Land of Canaan.

The first obstacle was the walled city of Jericho.

In preparation for conquest,
Joshua sent two spies on a scouting mission inside the wall.

There the spies met Rahab, a local harlot and innkeeper, who lived within the wall itself.
Hearing of the miraculous events surrounding the wandering nation of Israel,
Rahab came to believe in God.

Rahab - Women of Advent
watercolor & pastel / 10X8


Rahab hid the spies from local soldiers
and then allowed them to escape down a rope that had been tied to her window.

In return for her help, the spies swore an oath that the Jewish army 
would spare the lives of Rahab and her family during the destruction of Jericho.
The spies told Rahab to replace the rope with a scarlet cord
 & leave it in her window as a sign of protection.

The spies honored their promise, and Rahab gained God's favor.
She became the mother of Boaz
and the great-grandmother of King David. 

. . . . . . .


The assignment was to portray Rahab in her later years.

First, the paper was covered with powdered graphite using a paper towel.
The image was started by erasing areas to create lights.



Charcoal laid in the shadows,
and a thin red line was used to symbolize the scarlet cord.

Rahab - Women of Advent
Charcoal / 10X8 

Hope to see you next Sunday.



57 comments:

  1. This is so beautiful Chris, thanks for describing your layering process.

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    1. Thank you so much, Christine.
      And you're welcome. It was interesting doing it that way.

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  2. Wow!!
    At first thanks for the story about Rahab. I love to read this old stories written in your own words.
    The portrait of the young Rahab is so beautiful and expressiv. I watched again and again and I have lots of feelings about the way she looks but I can't put it into words...
    And the old Rahab is adorable. It's so much more difficult to paint old people, I think.
    In some way she is as beautiful as the young Rahab. But her mouth seems to show of harm (I l hope this are the right words..) was that intended? Perhaps it's not right what I see - I just wanted to let you know. Ok, I will stop here :)
    No, I want to say thanks for showing how you did it. Very interesting.
    What means scarlet cord?

    Ciao Beate

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    1. Thanks, Beate!
      The "scarlet cord" was a length of thin red strands of string or rope, usually braided or woven together. Rahab tied it in her window as a sign for the conquering army to see; they knew not to hurt her or her family because she helped their cause.

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    2. Thanks for your explanation, dear Chris!

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  3. Beautiful!

    I love the story of Rahab.

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  4. Thanks, Beate!
    The "scarlet cord" was a length of thin red strands of string or rope, usually braided or woven together. Rahab tied it in her window as a sign for the conquering army to see; they knew not to hurt her or her family because she helped their cause.

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  5. Chris, you are one talented lady.! So diversified, your always working on different kinds of art.

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  6. Your post was a blessing! Good medicine for the soul. Your pieces are beautiful and powerful.

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    1. Thank you, Terri. Appreciate your lovely comment :)

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  7. Oh, that's a beautiful woman, such a warm portrait! Your ability is admirable, dear Chris! Very interesting is also the technique with graphite and erasing...I have never tried that before.
    I wish you still further a good, creative Advent season! Ulrike

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    1. Thank you, Ulrike. I hope you try using powdered graphite sometime.
      Wishing you a good, creative Advent season also, my friend.

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  8. love the portrait, never used powdered graphite my self looks very interesting

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  9. Now that is real talent. I love both pictures, the young and old Rahab. What a beauty she was when young.

    Thank you Chris for researching these stories and posting them here.

    God bless you always.

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    1. Thank you so much, Victor. If there was hope for Rahab, there is hope for anyone.
      God bless you, too, my friend :)

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  10. Hello Chris,
    What a wonderful paints are these again. The girl with the bandana is amazing.
    So fantastic.

    Best regards,
    Marco

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    1. Thank you, Marco. Appreciate your lovely comment :)

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  11. Interesting story...
    thank you for sharing the summary story of amazing woman, Rahab.

    Have a great day and God bless you

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  12. Oh these portraits are amazing - you are such a talented artist Chris!
    Wonderful!

    HUgs, Susi

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  13. Your work is getting better and better Chris!! Love all of these paintings..... your charcoal painting of Rehab is outstanding!!!!

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  14. Wow, I love the women's images and admire your skills! I did the same or similar thing recently in my portrait work. But a beginner Sadami did it upside down = covered the paper at the end = very time consuming. Yet, I enjoyed it and checked background again and again. Btw, next time, I should try it, covering first. Thank u for teaching me. Kind regards, Sadami

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    1. Thank you, Sadami.
      Hope you try the technique. I think you will really like it.

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  15. Bonjour chère amie,

    Deux très jolis portraits ! Je suis éblouie !

    Gros bisous 🌸

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  16. What amazing talents you have! I so love this story and your magnificent paintings!

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    1. Thank you so much, Chip Butter. I love the story, too :)

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  17. Both portraits are gorgeous, love the emphasis on the eyes, always very expressive !

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  18. Nice portrait, that pastel watercolor mix is very good has life. Drawing with extraordinary charcoal.
    Congratulations.
    Greetings.

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    1. Thank you, Jose. Appreciate your lovely comment.

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  19. Amazing work Chris. I love your subjects as well as your art. Great idea to try to show Rahab in later life. I have always loved this story too. Hugs!

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    1. Thank you, Debbie.
      Sending you a warm hug back :)

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  20. Both portraits are exquisite. Especially the B&W. Thanks for sharing your process. Looking forward for the rest of the women.

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    1. Thank you so much, Carol. I'm looking forward to exploring the other stories, too :)

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  21. Wow Chris...both of the portraits are stunning! You not only captured her youthful beauty but all the years of experience in those lines in her "aged" face. Awesome!

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  22. The younger Rahab is the most beautifully painted portrait - her eyes! her hair! and the wonderful warm colours.
    The way you drew the older Rahab is amazingly clever with a dramatic finish.
    Young to old - what a contrast.
    I loved to read the story as you told it too.

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    1. Thank you so much, Sheila.
      This series has been really nice to work on this Christmas season - more meaningful :)

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  23. I think these portraits are wonderful, I love the colours in the younger Rahab.
    Thank you too for sharing the story.

    A very enjoyable post, thank you.

    All the best Jan

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  24. Good evening, dear Chris! I am truly amazed at your beautiful talent. Everything you touch comes to life, my friend, and your works of art speaks directly to my heart. You are so gifted and these portraits are one-of-a-kind. Thank you for sharing.

    Love and hugs to you!

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    1. Thank you, Stephanie. The portraits are easier to do when you love the story.
      Appreciate your lovely comment, my friend. Hugs back to you!

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  25. You are a great artist! Both portraits of Rahab are fantastic! The expression on the first one is gorgeous! Very interesting is the technique with graphite and erasing - I admire all your artworks very much!
    Wish you happy days! Rike xx

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    1. Thank you so much, Rike, for your lovely comment. And I admire your creativity and artistry very much :)
      Wishing you a happy Advent!

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  26. Fascinating and your portraits are amazingly perceptive at showing the character of the women. All done with great art technique too.

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  27. Hello Chris, firstly sorry for not visiting for a while - I hope all is well with you.
    Having seen your amazing portraits today and wonderful story I am going to have come back and slowly catch up and see what I have missed :)
    Hope you have had a nice weekend and some art time too.
    Gill xx

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